How to Care For Pets In Hot Weather

Cat sitting on a cold ground during summer in the garden

Excessive heat during the summer months can be as vulnerable to pets, as it is to their human owners. When the temperature rises, there are many potential ways your pet can easily get hurt – make sure to watch for several potential threats and guard your pet against them.

How to Care for Pets in Hot Weather – Safety First

Dog having fun in the sea

  • Waddle your sun time – the hottest heat waves are during the peak hours of the day – between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. Save the walks with your pet for the morning or for the evening hours, when the weather’s more acceptable. It will be good for your health, too. But don’t take our word for granted – check out your pet’s behaviour. If he’s lying on the cold ground, cooling his body, then that means it’s already too hot for him to go outside.
  • Walk on grass – it’s a much more comfortable surface for the gentle paws of your pet than a hot pavement. In order to isolate the heat, you can put your pet into boots. Just as during the cold winter the boots will serve as an isolation for the feet from the cold, during hot summer days they will provide protection against the hot temperatures.
  • Don’t leave them locked in the car – it’s a common problem around the world and it’s simply out of the question to leave your pet inside the car when the heat’s rising high. Overheating inside the closed metal box could easily result in a heat stroke – either leave your pet at home or carry him with you at all times.
  • Provide water and shade – make sure your pets always have access to cool water and a shade to hide from the heat. If that’s not possible, take them indoors, so that they stay cool enough to regulate their own body temperature. Be extra careful, according to the pet breed – an overweight dog or a cat will need more water than usual. Same is the deal with pets with darker shade.
  • Call the vet when there’s a heat stroke coming – an animal in heat distress will pant and may drool or vomit, they feel hot to the touch and seem listless or dazed. Take them to a cool place, bathe them with cool water and encourage them to drink. You do have your vet’s number somewhere easily in hand, don’t you?

The Sneaky Stranger-Dangers of the Summer

Dogs playing chase with each other

Ticks

Your dog will be spending more time outdoors in the summer and one of the biggest dangers of the green grassy fields he will joyfully run around is ticks. After every walk and especially trips in the wild nature, carefully check your dog’s skin for them. They affect cats less, but pay attention to them, too, if you happen to have one.

How to remove a tick from your pet? Check out this handy guide here. The diseases that ticks carry vary a lot, with Lyme disease as one of the most dangerous of them all. The problem is, the symptoms are very often too difficult to notice, so consult with your vet about your dog’s overall health after you find a tick. Better yet, bring the peeve’s body for testing in the vet’s lab.

Bee Stings

That buzzing sound in the bushes sounds to your pet as a potential call to search that little dweller. This curiosity will easily lead to stings, and if you see your pet swelled up after their play in the grass, get a medicine from your vet to help them recover.

Serpents

Hotter days present an opportunity for you to let your pet go outside a bit – we mean, come on, he’s been barking all day long, trying to get your attention to release him to a daily dose of freedom. However, bear in mind that there are worse things than excessive noise from your pets, namely bites from those snaky bush lurkers. Pets love exploring, especially dogs and cats, while snakes are hiding specialists. That’s a disastrous combination.

If you happen to have a large yard, or you spend a lot of time outdoors with your pets, there is a larger risk of encountering one of them snakes. Even though most of them are not poisonous, their bites are still bites. Imagine what you will say to your kid if they see a snake – make sure to get that idea straight into your pet’s head, too. Let it go, leave the wild animal alone – it’s an impossible friendship.

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